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Search Results 59 to 93 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
be contained. >> the and -- this is not a challenge that can be contained. >> united states is engaging in a policy of bullying. >> some are engaging the absurd notion that a nuclear-arm iraned -- nuclear-armed iran would stabilize the middle east. yeah, right. >> president obama is being criticized for having time to appear on "the view" but not meet with prime minister netanyahu. your question -- why didn't they come out with that right off the bat? >> the attack happened five days after the charlotte convention. democrats had to climb over and over again, spike the football 100 times over killing osama bin laden. that was the one achievement, and the implication is that he was the guy who took care of al eda. you have the sacking at the u.s. embassy, the killing of the ambassador. the administration did not on that story to coexist with their theme and how great an anti terror policy obama had. they deceived the country, sending susan rice out on the sunday shows and attending that this was the outcrop -- outgrowth of a demonstration. everybody over the age of nine could see that it
in the united states of america and you're still seeing this-- a fully functional ecosystem, phenomenal pulses of life moving up these rivers. >> wild fish are important because they are beautiful. it's a beautiful species and they are a miracle of nature. but they're important because they are also the food source for everything from bears to caddisflies to eagles to killer whales. i mean, that's what feeds the food webs of the north pacific, wild salmon protein, pumped out of the ocean up into the rivers, delivered almost perfectly to every corner of the watershed. >> narrator: bristol bay's great sockeye salmon run is concentrated in several major river systems. each year, millions of fish swim up rivers like the nushagak or the kvichak to get to their spawning streams. it's here, north of lake iliamna, between two branches of that pristine watershed, that an extraordinary discovery has been made. for decades, several mining companies have been exploring the area, drilling core samples and mapping an area called the pebble deposit. this was in 2007. >> what we're doing here is in-fill drill
it become a genuine crisis. it's also a reminder to the united states of why it is seen as important by many nations in asia that we stay as a balancing factor in the military relationship there >> warner: china doesn't like that >> they would prefer it to having japan arm itself. so everybody resents the u.s. presence but is more comforting than the most obvious alternative > waer: you have a prediction? >> i think it will calm down but the issues will be simmering for some time. all the territorial maritime issues that are taking place now are of a peace. the political process is still playing out in china. the leaders there want to contain the damage to themselves but they don't want to be so suppressing of popular opinion that they're seen as opposing popular will on the issue of sovereignty >> warner: or out of touch. doug paal and jim fall owes, thank you. >> woodruff: next, seeking peace in syria and around the globe. jeffrey brown talks to former u.n. secretary general kofi annan. >> brown: kofi annan's first career u.n. staffer to rise to head the organization has spent more than 4
, he worked to pass campaign finance reform. as a united states senator, he was critical and to the passing of ethics and lobbying reform after the jack abramoff scandal. he refused to take contributions from registered lobbyists or political action committees. and as a presidential candidate, he promised to, quote, "tell the corporate lobbyists that their days of setting the agenda in washington are over." >>> i am in this race to tell the corporate lobbyists that their days of settg the agenda in washington are over. i have done more than any other candidate in this race to take on lobbyists, and won. they have not funded my campaign, they will not work in my white house, and they will not drown out the voices of the american people when i am president. >> and his own convention, was crawling with lobbyists schmoozing with politicians. and now, rahm emanuel has been turned loose by the president to go for the gold. did you suggest earlier that he didn't have a cice? that with the great accumulation of money by the republicans, he had to match them in order to be a viabl
by the united states. >> fundamentally we do not take seriously the threats of an attack on iran by them even though we are iran. iran at the end of the day is a great country. let me assure you we do have all defensive means at our disposal. >> prime minister netanyahu has said that israel simply cannot stand to have iran to get to the point where it has enough enriched uranium to be able to very quickly convert that to weapons grade and really essentially from a weaon in a matter of months. he's made it clear that israel is prepared to take military action to try to prevent that. do you think he's bluffing? >> you see, whether he's bluffing or he really intends that does not even come into the equation. for us. what are these scientists? put a world map in front of you. put an at last in front of you. iran has been iran for the last 7,000-10,000 years. they have been occupying those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support and force of the westerners. they have no roots there in history. >> ifill: i'm joined by margaret warner who is at the u.n. this afternoon. margaret, tha
. >> for the first time in centuries the president of the united states has officially declared himself an enemy of traditional marriage between one man and one woman. >> you are witness to a modern tale of resurrection. a second-coming. the bible speaks of lazarus, raised by jesus from the grave to walk again among the living. ralph reed, too, has been returned to life, political life. but he goes lazarus one further. lazarus was a poor man. reed is rich, and he just keeps getting richer from mixing religion and politics. and that's a story you don't want to miss. at age 33, ralph reed was the christian right's wonder boy. anointed in a 1995 "time" magazine cover story as the "right hand of god" for spinning the trust of conservative christians into political gold. it was reed who built the christian coalition of televangelist pat robertson into a powerful arm of the republican party. >> as religious conservatives we have finally gained what we have always sought. a place at the table, a sense of legitimacy and a voice in the conversation that we call democracy. >> in 2000, reed helped put geor
the united states because of the role it played in toppling colonel qaddafi, but also because coy say with every conversation i have had with every libyan here in the last three or four days a sense of shock, dismay and embarrassment over what happened at the killing of th u.s. em was door. and think that has really been wakup cl for many here who, in fact, want to take action now against these militias and armed groups, whether they are able to do it or not is another question. >> brown: are you picking up any more about who was responsible, who's being looked at, who is being discussed over there? >> i mean it is early. most people assume that it's radical jihadist group which is known here and which now some of the militias are going after. but there is really a broader problem here. the problem ishat since the fall of qaddafi the authorities are relying not on their own security forces, becauseheyon't have any they have subcontracted security to militias and armed groups because they need someone to step in. but those very forces are the ones that are fueling the instability and t
that were not done. simple, humanitarian acts that had not been done by the united states government or the government of the confederacy. so what i find so uplifting about it is watching as drew was saying this reonse which is profoundly human and speaks to what we all have inside ourselves. the desire to find something larger. not just in a beyond but a larger here and now. some larger sense of identity. some value in the real world that's beyond our own immediate reach. and you see that in a profound way in the civil war, the battlefields. >> rose: we have talked about some other battles. the get sees berg address said what about this? >> well, the get sees berg address read in the context of this understanding of death takes on a particular force in that what lincoln is really trying to do is say what are all these deaths for. and how do they redefine who we are as a people. these people who died that a nation might live so their deaths are the source of a nation's survival. that ties the nation so tightly to the sacrifice. but then he also talks about what the united states is f
, there is instincts, there's tough calls. >> mr. speaker, the president of the united states. >> woodruff: one of the criticisms of mr. obama's leadership is that he's had so much difficulty winning support from congress. many republicans say that's because he was too beholden to his democratic base. tom davis is a former g.o.p. congressman from virginia. >> when he got elected i think he had every intention of trying to bring everybody together behind him, let's work together, but he had a democratic congress. the minute you go over and sit down with the republicans you'll have pelosi and the democrats fighting saying "we won the election." so the pressure is for him to produce a work product and the republicans weren't going to follow over and say "oh, yeah, let's work together." it's tough situation. when your party controls both houses, those interest groups control the agenda. they don't want to give it away to the other side. >> reporter: but the number two democrat, dick durbin, said the president often took on leaders of his own party. he recounted a late night white house meeting on h
: pardon me please. pardon you. >> but i think the president of the united states making a statement of support was incredibly significant because it made a lot of other european allies who had been a bit kind of nervous. itstiffened their spine and got them behind the case then the next thing that happened was the election of the blair government in particular the fact that he put robin cook as foreign secretary and robin cook had a really personal passion to get this sorted out and suddenly there was a kind of energy there which there hadn't before. he said "we're going to fix this it can't stand, leave it to me, it's going to be done." so suddenly there was an energy in the british government suorted by-- real support from the united states. >> rose: how about people in the muslim community? >> well, one thing that's interesting is that during these years there was a lot of support from muslim writers and intellectuals. there was a book published here and in europe which was called "for rushdie" which was essays by a hundred different muslim writers, journalists, intellectuals in
condemnation has given a strong message that the united states government not only condemns it, but has absolutely no support for such blasphemous videos or content anywhere. i think that is an important message. i think that should go a long way in ending the violence on many streets in the world. >> brown: but in iran, at a military parade, president mahmoud ahmadinejad accused the u.s. and others of promoting strife under the guise of protecting civil liberties. >> ( translated ): they are seeking to trigger ethnic and religious conflicts. they chant fake slogans of freedom, and claim commitment to freedom of thought and freedom of speech. >> brown: and back in pakistan, prime minister raja pervez ashraf called for the world to outlaw blasphemy. >> we are demanding that the united nations and other international organizations seek a law that bans such hate speech aimed at fomenting hatred and sowing the seeds of discord through such falsehood. >> brown: in the meantime, pakistan shut down youtube access after the web site refused to remove the anti- islamic video. and in france, auth
, ramin mellegard at the tokyo stock exchange. >>> the drought in the united states may trigger another food crisis across the globe. to avoid this, three agencies at the united nations are urging governments around the world to take joint action. the food and agriculture organization, the world food program, and the international fund for agricultural development released a statement saying that corn prices have surged due to the record drought in the u.s. the agencies warn that soaring prices of corn, wheat and soybeans could cause a recurrence of the global food crisis seen in 2007 and 2008. they call for short-term efforts to curb the sharp rise in food prices that might seriously affect more people. it also notes there needs to be review of the current framework for producing and distributing food as the world population is growing. the agencies urge countries to avoid panic buying and refrain from imposing export restrictions. they also appeal for international support to help poor nations boost their food output. that is all for me for this hour. i'll leave you with a recap of th
but it is still the third biggest killer in the united states. there is more talk about stroke. >> there is more treatment for it, too. >> why are they talking about it? >> because they can prevent it. talking about stroke is a preventive thing we have for heart attacks and now we have one for stroke. you try to diagnose it early. sometimes you can treat it very early. >> third biggest killer? >> something like. that >> . >> have you heard of a sound stroke? >> yes. it -- >> have you heard of a silent stroke? >> it means somebody doesn't really know. >> it is eye sent. >> they do a cat scan or mri and see signs that there was death of brain tissue. >> how bad? >> it depends. you have a thing where somebody has, like, dementia, which is dementias are a big $10 word for senility. >> can a silent stroke be a big stroke? >> no >> silent by definition means it's unobserved? >> that's right. it doesn't show up clinically. >> it doesn't show up clinically or behaviorally? >> well, it will show up behaviorally. >> how? >> they will lose interests in things, sit in a room and not talk. >> how about dizzi
that only has meaning over the long term. human nature is such that we must do base building. the united states is simply about to go through a period where we must repair our balance sheet. >> susan: any diskrorses to make on the stacks. >> we own everything we recommend or are in the process of buying. >> susan: another that's great. thank so much randall. randall ely, of the edgar j. lomack company. >> susie: fashion week has been taking place in new york city this week. the shows are invitation-only, and give celebrities and fashion writers the first glimpse of a designer's newest collection. nanette lepore was one of the nearly 100 designers featured at the event. if you don't know who she is, you could soon be seeing her name in a well-known, national department store chain. erika miller reports from the runway. >> reporter: the colors are bright, the prints bold, the fabrics soft and delicate. designer nanette lepore says the inspiration for her latest collection came from a vase. >> i was inspired by the porcelain room at the charlottenburg palace in berlin. some of the dresses
is the place to be. >> would you rather be in singapore than the united states? >> i would. i think they perform better than the u.s. >> tom: you are investing in culture. they make ammonia nitrogen. >> this is a seven percent yield. >> food prices are rising and hence the demand for fertilizer rising, and ammonium nitrate and the ammonia are the ingredients. >> and -- >> it's really all things coming together >> chris, last time we had you are, march 16th. 2012. >> tom: apple launched the iphone today. you liked three stocks back then, including kbe, a bank exchange traded fund. it's down two percent. and emerging markets and corporate fund fund up five percent, and a real estate investment fund up almost 18%. you style like these? >> i like them all, and certainly the emerging bond fund, pays five percent, and the reits, pay seven%. great opportunities. >> you own these? >> i always eat my own cooking. >> serving it up, chris orndorff with western assets. >> susie: and looking ahead. from the n.y.s.e. to the c.m.e., it's politics in the pits. what are the critical issues fo
for coal. >> you have say unique sper spective. you say coal provides 10% of the electricity in the united states. what's your take on economic demand as we move into the new year? >> well, what we're not seeing is strong industrial and manufacturing demand. not to say that we're not seeing growth in certain areas. i think in terms of economic activity. we're seeing a little growth, but it's not to the point where it needs to be in our view to make a fundamental difference to getting the economy where it ought to be in terms of higher levels of gdp growth. we appreciate the insights. it's greg boyce, the ceo of peabody energy. you can see our entire interview online at also online, how do long-term investors fit into the market in this age of high-frequency trading? visit tomorrow on nbr, home prices aren't the only things going up in housing-- the cost of land also is on the rise. and the latest efforts for parents and students to make better financial decisions when it comes to paying for college. could this hail mary pass force a breakthrough in one of the country's hi
such as in europe. >> tom: i want to ask about demand here in the united states, because natural gas prices have been very low for quite some period of time thanks to new drilling techniques that have led to an abundance of natural gas. how high are natural gas prices have to go in order for your industry, the coal miners, to begin to see a pickup in demand domestically? >> well, when we see gas get back to the $3 range, coal will be back in money in terms of dispatching the electricity market. i think it's public policys that don't allow us to compete and we're starting to see what we believe are bad public policys that are going to carry bad chemical weaponss for american business and american consumers. >> tom: i want to ask you about one of those, an e. p. a. rule that would require plants built after april 2013, power plants, to have carbon capture technology. what kind of impact may that have on coal demand there after? >> well, tom, that is a policy that says we're not going to invest in the future of coal and future of clean coal technology, because if you're going to require something t
, the ability to grab market share. it has continued to see its market share erode down to 10% in the united states now compared to google and apple which have been growing their share. >> well, there is positives in the results and it was nice to see the total subscriber base grow to that 80 million it is important to remember that the company still saw revenue decline by 31% on a year-over-year basis. the number of units that were shipped, that 7.4 million for the entire quarter that compared to the 5 million apple sold and on its first weekend of sales are for thix phone 5. so this is a company that has-losing share, people view the platform as being behind the curve technologically and they still have a lot of ground to cover to catch up. >> does it have any price pog we are when it comes to its new device the blackberry -- in other words, it may not make it up on volume but can it continue to see margins and perhaps even increase margins within the company posted a loss this quarter and the expectations are they are going to post a loss in the next your as well. so they are not driving
to have more competitors, last year the united states had like 87% of the global market, 60 some odd billion dollars. what you'll see is they will not have as high of a share. i think the u.s. company share will drop back closer to 50%. >> tom: does the market shrink asell? or does that market continue to grow even with more competitors? >> well, the market grew substantially this year, primarily because of the threat that many middle east countries perceive from iran so, that was the big uptick in the global market. but again i think that the competition will be in what we call the developing countries, europe is not increasing its defense budget, our budget is going to, it's already going down and it probably will go down even more, even if we don't get sequestration, you will see further reductions as we try to grap well the deficit. >> tom: what's your best guess on this, i know you're in the a company analyst, but do you think this deal passes regulatory muster internationally? >> i think it will, because we had the same questions back in the 90s when we had, for example, lockhe
with the european debt crisis, and even within the united states, with it being an election year. >> reporter: but burberry says it has been talking to other luxury goods makers, so it knows it's not alone in seeing the slowdown. as a result, luxury good stocks like lvmh, tiffany, and coach also fell today, although they didn't get hit nearly as hard as burberry. it's not just luxury firms getting hurt by the global slowdown. many other bellwether firms have said revenues are suffering due to weaker sales in china, europe and elsewhere. in the s&p 500, there have been 88 negative pre-announcements for the third quarter so far, and only 20 positive ones. >> the number of negative pre- announcements we've received is the worst in over a decade. we've already seen analysts become very bearish on these companies. >> reporter: last week, chipmaker intel drastically reduced its sales forecast, warning consumers and businesses are buying fewer personal computers. the company also withdrew its full-year guidance, which is seen as a sign of extreme uncertainty. and fedex recently cut its earnings fore
that they had, that has to do with the psyche of the united states today. >> it absolutely does. but you know, our parents did not, you know, the things that they created, that rrandparents created were not done for free. we need to be, we need to invest-- i mean i once saw tom freedman who is from maryland speak to the national governors. and i saw him talk about the five pillars that have made us a great nation. you know, one of them is the fact that we always invest more in every again raise in higher and better education for every generation. >> right. the second one, the investments we make and can only make together in the infrastructure that undergirds our commerce and our country, the roads, the cleanwaer infrastructur and thlike. thehird one are the investments we make in research and development. >> right. >> the fourth one is a balanced and predictable rule of law and the fifth one is a rational immigration policy. i mean there are other ways to formulate that. but i think all of it points to the traditional disciplines that other generations had. right now i think too many of us w
"brown v. board of education." think of cases that have interpreted the constitution of the united states around equal rights and so when we talk about the importance of the presidency it's certainly about the economic issues of that nature. but this could have impacts for hundreds of years. >> i do have to ask this question. there's going to be 28 women paraded on the stage tonight to talk about the power of the republican party. >> we only have 17% of women in congress. we only have 17 women senators, we only have six governors who are women we still have a very long way to go and when the house of representatives is having a hearing about access to birth control and the first panel is devoid of a woman, women women's voices aren't being heard. >> ifill: thank you both, one of those women is on the floor right now, that's congresswoman nidia valasquez of new york. >> i am proud to speak to you as a hispanic american. as a proud latina and a puerto rican. (cheers and applause) from being the first in my family to attend college to becoming the first latina to chair a full congressional c
a president of the united states. that's a people president. >> suarez: not all the people are happy. occupy protesters, joined by a big coalition of other pressure groups, took to the streets of charlotte, accompanied by a like number of police and reporters to bring their complaints to the convention about the president's lack of action on immigration, climate change, on bailing out the banks while millions lost their homes, since the president took office, william albritton says he's working harder for less money. >> i'm working at a warehouse now and i have a side job doing landscaping for a company, but i'm probably working 60 hours a week and i make right around $400 a week, before i was 40 hours a week and making $400. >> suarez: many of the protestors said there isn't much difference between democrats and republicans. they're skeptical of the president's links to wealthy donors and wall street. katherine fowler is still willing to give barack obama a chance. >> we have a message for the president. i support him, but i also want him to listen to me. we are concerned that the the middl
was a united states senator. has there been a new idea in obama world in the past three or four years. i have trouble, frankly, thinking of that thing. but they have to unveil something to-- and you know the economist, the cover is-- of the coming issue is one little question, mr. obama what do you want to do. and that is the question. >> well, they're saying they had a conference call today with reporters and they are saying we will talk about the second term so i guess we'll find out. >> better have something pretty specific i think. >> we are specifically glad that the two of you made it safely back to washington. we know you are heading to charlotte with all of us for next week. david brooks, mark shields, thank you. >> woodruff: and a postscript-- we have a week's worth of highlights from the republican national convention online, including all of mitt romney's acceptance remarks and other speeches. >> brown: again, the major developments of the day: fresh off his convention, republican presidential nominee mitt romney flew to louisiana to survey the hurricane damage. president obama add
the united states? >> indeed, there is. the arctic sea ice essentially is a big reflector of solar energy during the summer and that keeps the arctic cooler than it normally would be. it acts like an air conditioner for the earth's climate system and that helps not only keep the arctic cooler but also the globe as well. and it's basically a safe for heed that comes in at the equator, gets transported to the north you lose the heat in the arctic. and that transfer of eat from the equator to the poles, that essentially helps set up things like the jet stream, prevailing winds, weather tracks. so as we start to lose the ice cover and warm up the arctic, essentially that's changing the balance between the kuwaitor and the poles and that will shift things like storm tracks and the jet stream and that will change weather patterns and we've seen some evidence of that already and we expect to see more in the future, although we're still in the early stages of understanding that completely. >> suarez: you know, it's a commonplace in stories written about what's happening in greenland, what's happe
, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, three times, russia and china say no. and, therefore, up to now, we haven't been able to intervene. which is a humanitarian catastrophe. because every day you have more than 200 people killed. and because the security council doesn't say yes, we can't do anything. no, it's
"first national bank of boston vs. bellotti," where he said, "the state need not permit its own creature to coume it." and yet, this court is saying that, "we must permit the creation of the state legislures to consume our politics." and so to me, the citizens united case is the emblem for the whole era we're in. we're living in the "citizens united era," i think. >> but before citizens united, wealthy people were funneling money into politics, corporations were forming political action committees. and ceos of those corporations were lavishing money on selected favored political candidates. >> absolutely right, the corporate voice was never missing. and that's something, y know, justice stevens has pointed out. he said, "there were many faults to american politics. but nobody thought that a lack or a dearth of corporate voices was among the vices." but there was still a radical change effectuated by the majority -- >> how so? radical? >> in citizens united. >> what do you mean? >> because before corporations could have issue ads. they could take out an ad in the "new york times" on somet
of their possession of nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction to threaten states. >> translator: israel's continuing threat to resort to military action against our nation is a clear example of this bitter reality. >> he also called for reform of the united nations and the creation of a new world order. iran chairs the conference of nonaligned countries made up of 120 countries and territories. he said unfairness and discrimination against developing countries by a few industrialized nations is creating an economic divide and fueling conflicts. >>> two car bombs exploded near the syrian army headquarters in the capital of damascus. the blast killed at least four people. the explosion struck early wednesday morning, they were followed by several hours of gun battles between rebel fighters and government forces in the downtown area. an anti-government activist told nhk the explosions hit the third and fourth floors of the building. four people died. syrian information minister said on a state television that the explosions caused only minor damage. he said there were no casualties and tha
's the president of the united states. i think it would be irresponsible not to. >> i think it was shocking omission for romney. i thought fred hide's column in washington post was right on. we have a hot war going on right now in the month of august. i think close to 60 people, 60 americans died in afghanistan. >> charlie:did they have an explanation for that? >> the oam explanation he talked about it the day before in a speech in minneapolis. no one saw t most reporters didn't see. >> charlie:someone said one mention of afghanistan. >> i think that's right. it's not a popular topic even in that room con vengs with these delegates. spending is such a concern. too much money isn't spent on the war. it wouldn't have been a upon lar thing. i still think he could have thanked the troops for their service. that's not controversial. that's a patriotic thing to do. i think it's one of those mysteries of the convention almost as mysterious as clint eastwood he's the only one that mentioned afghanistan on that final evening. >> charlie:how does that the obama team feel about rekindling of 2008. i h
Search Results 59 to 93 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)